Psychology Lecture Series: Dr. Dorainne Green

-
Add to Calendar 2020-09-30 16:45:00 2020-09-30 17:45:00 Psychology Lecture Series: Dr. Dorainne Green The psychology department welcomes Dr. Dorainne Green as the first speaker in its 2020-2021 lecture series: Intervention Science: Harnessing Psychology to Address Oppressive Systems. Dr. Green will speak on: "Managing Emotions in the Face of Discrimination: Implications for Individual and Group Outcomes" Contending with discrimination can yield a cascade of negative affective, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological outcomes, but the emotions it engenders can also motivate collective action. Recent research on emotion regulation suggests that reflecting on negative experiences from a distanced, rather than immersed, perspective results in less negative affective outcomes, including diminished anger. In this talk, I will present research examining how emotion regulation strategies shape multiple consequences of exposure to group-based discrimination for members of different stigmatized groups (i.e., racial minorities, women). Specifically, I consider the implications of distanced compared with immersed processing of discriminatory events for individuals’ affective and cognitive experiences, physiological outcomes, and collective-action tendencies. Implications for potential interventions designed to mitigate the negative outcomes of contending with discrimination while preserving motivation for collective action will be discussed. Dorainne Green, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University. She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Northwestern University in 2016. Her research explores the pathways through which stigma-related stressors contribute to disparities in education and health between socially advantaged and socially disadvantaged individuals. A primary interest is the identification of strategies to help stigmatized individuals manage the challenges of navigating diverse spaces, including those with the potential to expose them to stigma-related stressors. Free and open to the public. This event may be used to satisfy the Lecture Reflection Requirement in PSYC204, PSYC303, PSYC490 and PSYC493/494. Starting at 4:15 pm, Dr. Green will be available at the Zoom link for an informal virtual chat with students/faculty/staff before the lecture presentation. Join Zoom Meetinghttps://smcm.zoom.us/j/99045141808 Meeting ID: 990 4514 1808Passcode: PsycSeries One tap mobile +13017158592,,99045141808#,,,,,,0#,,4297516939# US (Germantown) +13126266799,,99045141808#,,,,,,0#,,4297516939# US (Chicago) Dial by your location         +1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)         +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)         +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)         +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)         +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)         +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston) Meeting ID: 990 4514 1808 Passcode: 4297516939 Find your local number: https://smcm.zoom.us/u/adbz6EU9Yi   Department of Psychology, Lecture and Fine Arts Committee Dr. Gili Freedman America/New_York public
-
Virtual Lecture - Access Details Below
Free

The psychology department welcomes Dr. Dorainne Green as the first speaker in its 2020-2021 lecture series: Intervention Science: Harnessing Psychology to Address Oppressive Systems.

Dr. Green will speak on: "Managing Emotions in the Face of Discrimination: Implications for Individual and Group Outcomes"

Contending with discrimination can yield a cascade of negative affective, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological outcomes, but the emotions it engenders can also motivate collective action. Recent research on emotion regulation suggests that reflecting on negative experiences from a distanced, rather than immersed, perspective results in less negative affective outcomes, including diminished anger. In this talk, I will present research examining how emotion regulation strategies shape multiple consequences of exposure to group-based discrimination for members of different stigmatized groups (i.e., racial minorities, women). Specifically, I consider the implications of distanced compared with immersed processing of discriminatory events for individuals’ affective and cognitive experiences, physiological outcomes, and collective-action tendencies. Implications for potential interventions designed to mitigate the negative outcomes of contending with discrimination while preserving motivation for collective action will be discussed.

Dorainne Green, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University. She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Northwestern University in 2016. Her research explores the pathways through which stigma-related stressors contribute to disparities in education and health between socially advantaged and socially disadvantaged individuals. A primary interest is the identification of strategies to help stigmatized individuals manage the challenges of navigating diverse spaces, including those with the potential to expose them to stigma-related stressors.

Free and open to the public.
This event may be used to satisfy the Lecture Reflection Requirement in PSYC204, PSYC303, PSYC490 and PSYC493/494.

Starting at 4:15 pm, Dr. Green will be available at the Zoom link for an informal virtual chat with students/faculty/staff before the lecture presentation.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://smcm.zoom.us/j/99045141808

Meeting ID: 990 4514 1808
Passcode: PsycSeries
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,99045141808#,,,,,,0#,,4297516939# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,99045141808#,,,,,,0#,,4297516939# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
Meeting ID: 990 4514 1808
Passcode: 4297516939
Find your local number: https://smcm.zoom.us/u/adbz6EU9Yi
 

Event Sponsor(s)
Department of Psychology, Lecture and Fine Arts Committee
Dr. Gili Freedman
gfreedman@smcm.edu
240-895-4426
Event Group
Psychology
Lecture or Talk